Our Company > Our Projects > DigIndy Tunnel System

Public Art & Cleaner Waterways

 

At Citizens Energy Group, our passion for bettering Indy runs really deep – 250 feet deep to be exact! The DigIndy Art Project was started in 2018 to use public art to raise awareness of the DigIndy Tunnel System, a 28-mile network of tunnels located 250 feet under the city. Once completed, DigIndy will virtually eliminate sewer overflows into area waterways. Just like DigIndy will help improve our waterways, the DigIndy Art Project enhances our community with art.

Once again, Citizens has partnered with Big Car Collaborative to tell the story of DigIndy. In past years, the DigIndy Art Project featured original art, hand-painted on manhole covers around the city. This year, Citizens transformed its building at Meridian Street and Westfield Boulevard into a massive mural as part of Citizens’ ongoing efforts to educate the public about the transformational benefits DigIndy is providing our community. Big Car Creative Director Andy Fry and local artist Ess McKee created a large mural designed through collaborative crowdsourcing.

McKee was also one of the local artists that participated in the 2019 DigIndy Art Project.


Preview/Draft of the 2020 Mural and a FREE downloadable coloring sheet to color your own idea of the mural!



See the completed mural!

 

The DigIndy Tunnel System

Since 2012, Citizens Energy Group has been at work 250 feet below the city building the DigIndy Tunnel System, a 28-mile long network of 18-foot-diameter tunnels designed to store combined sewer overflow (CSO) after rain events. Upon completion, the DigIndy Tunnel System will reduce up to 99% of CSOs in area waterways.

 

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Art at Your Feet

For two years, original, local art for the DigIndy Art Project was easy to spot around town, all you had to do was look down!

Citizens partnered with a variety of local artists over the first two years of the DigIndy Art Project to create original works of art painted on manhole covers. Each piece created was inspired by the White River and other local waterways. Once finished, the covers were installed around Indianapolis, including the Cultural Trail, Broad Ripple,and Garfield Park, for all to see as they navigated the city on foot.

Revisit some of the art from the past DigIndy Art Projects.